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California’s depleted lake levels being filled amid heavy rain storms

Xavier Roger

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Following an extraordinarily wet winter, water is once again roaring into some of California’s largest reservoirs and lakes for the first time in nearly three years.

Southern California’s largest reservoir marked an incredible turnaround Monday when officials from the Metropolitan Water District  turned on the taps once again — releasing water transported from Northern California that gushed from valves at 600 cubic feet per second into the 4.5-mile-long Diamond Valley Lake. 

The reservoir near Hemet, about 40 miles west of Palm Springs, was built nearly three decades ago and holds twice as much water as all of the region’s other surface reservoirs combined, officials said.   

California rain:Trillions of gallons have soaked California. Is this the state’s wettest winter ever?

For the first time in nearly three years, water is once again roaring into Diamond Valley lake near Hemet in  Southern California, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California announced March 27, 2023.

In the North, a steady stream of storms have nearly filled the state’s largest reservoir, Lake Shasta, which has gone up 9 feet over the past week and 118 feet since Dec. 1. As of Wednesday afternoon, Lake Shasta was 82% full, according to Redding Record Searchlight, part of USA TODAY’s Network .

When full, the lake holds 4.5 million acre feet. An acre-foot is approximately 326,000 gallons.

For the first time in nearly three years, water is once again roaring into Diamond Valley lake near Hemet in  Southern California, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California announced March 27, 2023.
The water level on Lake Shasta has gone up more than 100 feet since Dec. 1, 2022. This is a picture of the back of Shasta Dam on Monday, March 20, 2023.

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